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A Socially Transmitted Disease: Teacher Qualifications and High School Drop-Out Rates

The main goal of this study is to quantify the impact of teacher interactions on student achievement to facilitate recommending policy strategies that minimize high school dropout rates. This study derives a system of differential equations that examine the effects that teachers have on minority high school students' learning experience in California and Arizona. The first mathematical model focuses on the impact that teacher dynamics have on a school's faculty composition. Teacher's dynamics are coupled with a second system that models student responses to teacher preparation and experience in order to investigate the effects of these interactions on high school dropout and completion rates.

Poster sessions award recipient at the National 2001 Joint Mathematics Meeting (AMS, MAA, AWM & NAM) in New Orleans, LA Oral presentation award recipient at the California Alliance for Minority Participation (CAMP) Conference at UC-Davis, April 2001. (Speaker: Alison Castro)

Article Number:
BU-1526-M

Year:
2000

Authors:
Corvina Boyd, Arizona State University
Alison Castro, University of California, Riverside
Nicolas M. Crisosto, University of California, Berkeley
Arlene Evangelista, Arizona State University
Project supervisors: Christogher Kribs-Zaleta, University of Texas, Arlington
Carlos Castillo-Chávez, Cornell University

socially_transmitted_disease_teacher_qualificaitons_and_dropout_rates.pdf